Premature Ejaculation 2017-03-01T14:39:47+00:00
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Premature Ejaculation

For millions of men, ejaculation occurs between thirty seconds and two minutes after beginning sexual intercourse. Many also experience ejaculation even before penetration has been achieved.

Obviously this is not ideal for a man or his partner and traditionally, premature ejaculation has been very difficult to solve. In fact the medical profession classifies premature ejaculation as untreatable.

If you are not in control of your ejaculation cycle then it will happen before you wish it to. The only truly appropriate and effective way to permanently overcome the effects of premature ejaculation is to discover the key to controlling your sexual responses. At ICASA you learn exactly how to do so through the Ten Step Sexual Recovery Programme. We teach you how to control the appropriate aspects involved so that you are in control of your mind and body, not the other way around. At ICASA you will be guided, step by step, through ten practical stages designed to help you find your sexual confidence and control.

It is widely recognised and agreed, amongst sex therapists, that premature ejaculation is the most common of all male sexual problems. What is not so clear, or agreed, is the definition of the condition. The question facing therapists, when presented with this complaint is, “What is premature and what is not? When, therefore, is treatment for the presenting complaint necessary and appropriate?” And ‘if so, what form of treatment is likely to be the most effective and appropriate?’ ‘The New Sex Therapy’ 1974 (Helen Singer Kaplan) states, “For some clinicians, the time which collapses between vaginal insertion and ejaculation is the crucial diagnostic criteria”. Other criteria used include the number of thrusts, the percentage of partner responses, etc. which occur before orgasm. In one textbook, prematurity is defined as the occurrence of orgasm thirty seconds after vaginal entry. One clinic has extended that criterion to one and a half minutes; another to two minutes, while a third excepts the patient for therapy if he ejaculates prior to ten thrusts.

Masters and Johnson diagnose a man as a premature ejaculator if he reaches orgasm before his partner does more than fifty percent of the time. Kaplan later suggested that premature ejaculation could additionally or alternatively be defined if the male did not have voluntary control over when he ejaculated. Prematurity can thus be said to exist when orgasm occurs reflexly, i.e. when it is beyond the man’s voluntary control once an intense level of sexual arousal is attained.

The American psychiatric Association, 1994, defined premature ejaculation as follows:

  • Persistent or recurrent ejaculation with minimal stimulation before, on, or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it
  • The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty

Jack Lee Rosenberg and Beverley Kitaen- Morse of Rosenberg-Kitaen Integrative Body Psychotherapy Institute, LA., define premature ejaculation from a more energetic perspective, “we say that an orgasm is premature when a man cannot contain his excitement long enough to build a charge sufficient for him to achieve a satisfying orgasm.”

Premature Ejaculation - Featured

Types of Premature Ejaculation

  1. ‘Simple’ premature ejaculation.
  2. ‘Simple and relational’ premature ejaculation.
  3. ‘Complicated’ premature ejaculation.
  4. ‘Complicated and relational’ premature ejaculation.

Criteria for Acceptance for Treatment through The ICASA Sexual Recovery Programme

The International Professional Surrogates Association (IPSA) has treated males with premature ejaculation since 1982 and The Centre of ICASA since 1994. In this time they have identified presenting cases in all of the above categories. ICASA defines premature ejaculation as involuntary ejaculation (as per Kaplan and American Psychiatric Association 1994 definitions) and recognises two primary types of premature ejaculation being appropriate cases for all treatment by Surrogate Partner Therapy using The ICASA Sexual Recovery Programme.

  • Fear of Intimacy related premature ejaculation. The men in this group have psychological and psychosocial issues that affect profoundly their ability to engage in relationships; usually having severe conflicts around intimacy, and have difficulty in integrating their feelings about sex. They have suffered with PE in past efforts to engage in relationships and lack the necessary confidence, intimacy skills or ejaculatory control to further attempt to engage in relationships.
  • Performance Anxiety related premature ejaculation. The men in this group have psychological and psychosocial issues that profoundly affect, or have affected in the past, their ability to manage relationships. They suffer with PE and some related erectile dysfunction and fear that the problems will re-occur, thereby creating an inability to engage in new relationships and hampering their ability to involve a partner in a collaborative way.

An ICASA study reports on 44 cases of men with medium age 38.45 years presenting alone with life-long history of extreme or severe premature ejaculation; defined as ‘Complicated Premature Ejaculation’: ‘Intercourse not possible because of early and uncontrolled ejaculation at or before penetration’ or ‘Only a brief period of sexual intercourse possible (a few seconds 5-30) because of early and uncontrolled ejaculation’. Through the ICASA. SPT programme, a 79% rate of satisfactory, marked or conclusive improvement was achieved in a median number of 12.15 sessions per client over a median duration of 23.58 weeks.

Group A were 23 men of average age 32.5 years presenting with Premature Ejaculation linked with Fear of Intimacy as the primary casual factor. In all cases, the client had no life-partner and complained of a lack of confidence necessary to attempt engaging in establishing relationships. In this group, an 82.61% rate of satisfactory, marked or conclusive improvement was achieved in an average number of 12.14 sessions over an average duration of 18.16 weeks.

Group B were 21 men of average age 44.56 years presenting with Premature Ejaculation linked with Performance Anxiety as the primary casual factor. All clients presented alone and reported linking the performance anxiety with past failed relationships due to premature ejaculation. In this group, a 76.19% rate of satisfactory, marked or conclusive improvement was achieved in an average number of 12.17 sessions over an average duration of 29 weeks.

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